A low bounce rate is a hallmark of a good website

What is Google Analytics Bounce Rate

Should You Worry About Your Bounce Rate?

A low bounce rate is often cited as a hallmark of a good website – 40% or lower is typically heralded as the goal – signaling that visitors are engaged with your site and finding useful content. A high bounce rate is often assumed to mean that your site is not doing its job. In reality, bounce rate means different things for different sites and the emphasis you place on it will vary according to the type of site you have and its goals.

What Does Bounce Rate Mean?

The definition from Google’s Analytics help pages is: “Bounce rate is the percentage of single-page visits or visits in which the person left your site from the entrance (landing) page.”

When is Bounce Rate a Relevant Metric?

  • If you have a sales or conversion process which requires the user to follow through multiple pages on your site.
  • If exploration of your site is important to your goals.
  • If you are trying to turn new visitors into loyal readers or customers.
  • If yours is a retail site and you want people to shop around and make purchases.
  • If your homepage is not inducing further clicks, particularly if it contains blog excerpts or other ‘teaser’ content.

What a High Bounce Rate Could Mean:

1. Keywords and content are mismatched.

In cases where visitors are coming from search engines, a high bounce rate may mean that the keywords they used and the content they found on your site are not aligned – so your site doesn’t meet their expectations in some way.

What you can do:

Analyze your keyword traffic and make sure your pages are optimized for the keywords you want and that the content is closely aligned with keywords and not misleading in any way.

2. The next step in your conversion or goal process is not obvious or easy enough.

What you can do:

Look at your landing pages with an objective eye and make the next step clear and easy to take.

3. The navigation on your site is confusing or unclear, making additional content hard to find.

What you can do:

Re-evaluate the navigation and see if there are ways to streamline or simplify. Also double-check for browser compatibility – perhaps the page is not displaying correctly under some conditions.

4. Your offer or product is not presented in a compelling or easy to understand way.

What you can do:

Look at your sales copy or offer details and see if you can refresh it or make it more appealing. You could try split-testing different versions to see which performs better.

5. Your site has technical problems. Particularly if your bounce rate suddenly spikes or displays an unusual trend, it could be an indication of technical issues – broken images or links, or something on the page not loading correctly.

What you can do:

Check for compatibility and broken links. Test the load speed of the page and generally make sure your code is as clean and functional as possible. Check for server outages and other issues that could have temporarily affected the functionality of your site.

Bounce Rates TipsA high bounce rate might not be a problem if:

  • You have a blog homepage containing all your recent posts in their entirety – Blogger blogs are notorious for this. When all your posts are presented up front there would be little reason for someone to clíck to any other pages.
  • You have a loyal blog following and your site has a higher proportion of returning visitors than new visitors. Your followers and subscribers may just want to read the newest post and have no need to visit other pages.
  • You are promoting a landing page which contains the call to action within it, such as submitting an email address. That single page can do its job effectively without requiring further clicks.
  • The call to action or conversion takes your visitor off-site – to an external shopping cart or email sign up for example. This would look like a bounce, but can still be a conversion.
  • Blogs typically have higher bounce rates compared to other types of sites so the same benchmarks do not apply.

Bounce Rate is Not the Only Metric.

Don’t look at bounce rate in isolation – look at the overall picture of your website and how it’s performing according to the metrics that matter to you. What DO you want your visitors to do at your site? Are you making it easy for them to do that, and are you measuring it?

Look for trends and other data that give you a fuller picture of what the bounce rate really means:

  • Is the bounce rate higher or lower for certain keywords?
  • Does it vary according to how people found your site? Search engines vs. social media, for example.
  • How does it vary with New vs. Returning visitors?
  • Which particular pages or types of content on your site have higher or lower bounce rates?
  • Look also at length of time the visitor spends on the page which could indicate whether or not they are reading what they find – this is very important for a blog.

Full Article: http://www.webtrainingwheels.com/social-media-small-business-training-program/

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Need to analyze your website traffic

Analyze Your Website Traffic

Analyzing and inspecting your website traffic statistics can be a very helpful tool for a variety of reasons. However, before you take advantage of this particular tool, you must understand how you can interpret the information.

The majority of web hosting companies provides you with basic website traffic information that you simply then need to interpret and make pertinent usage of. Nevertheless, the information you obtain from your host company may be too much to handle unless you learn how to put it to use for your particular business and website.

Let us begin by examining the most basic information – the average website visitors on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis.

These figures would be the most precise measure of the activity of your website. At first glance, it appears that the more traffic you see that is registered, the better you are able to presume your website is performing, however it is deemed an inaccurate perception.

In addition, you need to consider the behaviour of your website visitors once they come to your website in order to accurately measure the effectiveness of your site.

Generally there is usually a great false impression about what is popularly known as “hits” and what is genuinely effective, quality traffic to your website. Hits only denotes the amount of information requests received by the server.

If you believe about the fact that the hit can merely equate to the amount of graphics per web page, you will definitely get a solid idea of exactly how overblown the idea of hits can be. For instance, if your homepage has fifteen graphics on it, the server records this as fifteen hits, when in actuality we are referring to just one visitor looking at a single page on your website. As you can tell, hits are certainly not beneficial in analyzing your website traffic.

The more visitors that come to your website, the more precise your interpretation can become. The greater the traffic is to your website, the more accurate your analysis is going to be regarding the overall trends in visitor behavior. The smaller the amount of visitors, the anomalous can more easily distort the analysis.

The goal is to use the website traffic statistics to find out exactly how effectively or how badly your site is working for your visitors.

A good way to know for sure is to discover the length of time on average your visitors spend on your site. In the event the time spent is pretty quick, it typically signifies an underlying problem.

Then the challenge will be to find out exactly what that problem is.

Maybe your keywords and phrases tend to be directing the wrong type of visitors to your website, or perhaps your graphics are perplexing or daunting, causing the visitors to leave quickly.

Make use of the knowledge of the amount of time visitors are spending on your website to figure out specific problems, and as soon as you resolve those problems, continue using the time spent as a gauge of how successful your resolve has been.

In addition, website traffic statistics can assist you in determining the effective and ineffective areas of your website. If you have a webpage that you consider is very important, yet visitors tend to leave it quickly, that web page requires attention.

You may, for instance, take into account in improve the link to this page by making the link much more visible and enticing, or you could enhance the appearance of the actual web page or the ease that your visitors can easily gain access to the necessary information on that web page.

In case, on the other hand, you observe that website visitors tend to be spending considerable time on pages that you feel are much less important, you might take into account moving some of your sales copy and marketing concentration to that particular web page.

As you have seen, these statistics will certainly uncover vital information about the effectiveness of individual web pages, and visitor behavior and motivation. This is vital information to just about any successful Internet marketing campaign.

Your website without doubt has exit web pages, for instance a final order or contact page. This is the page from which you could expect your visitor to leave quickly. However, don’t assume that all visitors to your website will find precisely what he or she is searching for, therefore statistics may show you a variety of exit pages. In the event that a substantial percentage of visitors are leaving your website on a page not created for that purpose, you have to look closely at that specific web page in order to discover exactly what the problem is.

As soon as you figure out probable weak points on that web page, minimal modifications in content or graphic may have a tremendous effect on keeping visitors moving through your website as opposed to leaving at the wrong web page.

Once you have analyzed your visitor statistics, you are ready to turn to your keywords and phrases. Observe if there are specific keywords that leads a specific type of visitor to your site. The more targeted the visitor – which means that they come across what they are trying to find on your site, and even better, fill out your contact form or buy something – the more beneficial that keyword is.

Nevertheless, if you discover numerous visitors are now being directed – or should i point our misdirected – to your website by a specific keyword or phrase, that keyword calls for adjustment. Keywords and phrases are essential in delivering high quality visitors to your website who will be ready to do business with you. Close analysis of the keywords and phrases that your visitors are utilizing to locate your site will give you an important understanding of the needs and motivations of your visitors.

Last but not least, if you see that users are discovering your website by simply typing in your company name, break open the champagne! It indicates you have attained a significant level of brand reputation, and it is a positive indication of burgeoning accomplishment.

Full Article/Author:  http://guaranteedtrafficgeneration.com/

Top 10 Don’ts for SEO Copywriting.

internet copywriting

Following in the footsteps of Rand Fishkin and Guy Kawasaki, I decided to come up with my own list of don’ts.

There is no shortage of don’ts when it comes to SEO copywriting. It seems this niche got off to a rough start many years ago when early comers somehow misconstrued the core principles of the trade. Allow me to elaborate on how not to write SEO copy.

1. Don’t shove as many keyphrases into the copy as humanly possible.

It’s not about the sheer volume of search terms you include. Yes, Google and other engines should be able to follow what the page is about. Yes, engines are looking to match a searcher’s query with search engine optimized content on your web pages, but which pages land at the top is decided through a series of calculations far more complex than any simple ratio. When you overload copy with keyphrases you sacrifice quality and user experience.

2. Don’t lose site of balance.

If SEO copywriting isn’t about the percentage of keywords within the copy, then what is it about? Balance. You have two audiences with SEO copywriting: the search engines and your site visitors. But surprisingly, the balance doesn’t come with serving both masters well. The balance comes in how much you cater to the engines. You see, your site visitors always come first.

However, if you write with too little focus on the engines, you won’t see good rankings. If you put too much focus on the engines, you’ll start to lose your target audience. Balance… always balance.

3. Don’t let someone else choose the keywords.

If keyword research isn’t a service you offer, an SEO firm, keyword specialist or some other professional that your client hires will have to conduct the research. Don’t just accept keyphrases these folks toss your way. Ask to see the entire list with recommendations as to which terms would be best strategically. Then you, as the professional writer, can decide which will also work best within the copy.

4. Don’t sacrifice flow for numbers.

This is a follow-up to number three and is a major issue with bad SEO copywriting. SEOs or clients sometimes insist on using hacked-up search phrases that simply don’t work in a normal sentence. An example? “Candies samples free.” Many copywriters will just grin and bear it, sacrificing quality and flow for the sake of competitive values or other numbers. The result is often some obnoxious sentence like, “If you’re looking for candies samples free, you’ve come to the right place!” Forcing a phrase into the copy at all costs never turns out well.

internet-copywriting5. Don’t use keyphrases that don’t apply to the page.

If you operate a site about wedding receptions, don’t try to force a search term about wedding dresses into the copy just because it pulls a lot of traffic. (A) Unless you sell, alter or design wedding dresses, it won’t be applicable. (B) Even if you manage to get the page ranked well for the phrase [wedding dresses], once the visitor clicks to your site and realizes you have nothing to do with wedding dresses, they will leave. It’s a waste of time and effort and it creates a poor user experience.

6. Don’t use misspellings and correct spellings on the same page.

I fully understand that the misspellings of keyphrases can be valuable search terms. However, to mix correct spellings and misspellings within the same page of copy looks like you’ve got a bunch of typos in the content. It’s just not professional. Some writers will go for the old, “We rent limousines (sometimes spelled limosenes) for the most affordable prices in town.” I don’t care for that approach. It’s just not natural. Would you ever see brochure or newspaper copy that reads that way? I think not.

7. Don’t use keyphrases the exact same way every time.

This is how we end up with horrible SEO copy that sounds like a 4th grader wrote it. (See #4.) There are lots of ways to use keywords in copy, not just one. In order to sound natural, you have to get creative with your keyphrase use. One way is to break up phrases using punctuation. Since search engines don’t pay attention to basic punctuation marks, you can easily write something using the search term [real estate Hawaii] that reads like this: “Currently there is an impressive selection of available real estate. Hawaii listings can be…” See? “Real estate” is at the end of the first sentence and “Hawaii” is at the beginning of the second sentence. The engines ignore the period so there’s no problem.

8. Don’t use all types of search phrases for every situation.

There are many ways in which this “don’t” applies. One quick example is that of an ecommerce site. It wouldn’t be advisable to use specific, long-tail keyphrases on the home page of your site. They are much too specific in most cases and are better suited for individual product pages. Broader terms are typically best for an ecommerce home page. If you don’t understand the best applications for the various types of keywords, you’re likely to have lackluster results.

9. Don’t neglect ALT tags/image attributes.

These tags are the ones associated with images on your pages and they carry a good deal of weight especially if the image is used as a link. The ALT text counts the same as anchor text in a text-based link. Depending on a few different factors, ALT text may be a good place for those misspellings mentioned in #6.

10. Don’t forget the chain of protocol.

There’s a method to the SEO copywriting madness. The idea is not to get as many different keyphrases onto a page as possible. Just the opposite, in fact. Rather than having 12 different search terms used only one time each, you need to use two to four keyphrases (depending on the length of your copy) per page. The title, META tags, ALT tags, other coding elements and on-page copy need to support each other as far as keyphrase use goes. Your goal is to let the engines know that you have original, relevant content about a narrow topic.

Unless you have an exceptional number of back links built up, just mentioning [dark chocolate], [chocolate strawberries], [chocolate chip cookies], [chocolate cake], [chocolate desserts], [organic chocolate] and [chocolate cheesecake] once each on a web page isn’t likely to do a lot of good. Instead, pick two or three terms which are closely related and use them several times each along with mentioning them in your tags.

When you avoid making common mistakes, you’ll find your SEO copywriting flows much better, is more natural-sounding and ranks higher, too.

 

 

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